Tag Archive: VVols

Jul 10 2015

Comparing Virtual Volume (VVol) limits to VMFS/NFS limits

I was going through some VVol documentation and found this comparison between VVol limits and VMFS/NFS limits in vSphere 6.0:

VMFS/NFS Limits#VVol Limits#
VMDK size64TBData VVol size64TB
Virtual Disks per host2,048VVols bound to a host4,096*
LUNs/NAS mounts per host256Protocol Endpoints per host256
Volume size64TBStorage Container size2 ^ 64**
Volumes per host256Storage Containers per host256
Adapter Queue depth32Adapter Queue depth32
Configured VASA Providers per host128
Configured VVol‐managed
storage arrays per ESXi host
64

* A host can see more than 4096 VVols, but can have only 4096 VVols bound at any given point in time (binding occurs when a VM is powered on)
** ridiculously large number

Some additional notes:

  • While multiple VVol Storage Containers are supported, it’s up to each vendor to decide what they want to support. Today many vendors only support a single Storage Container which encompasses an entire storage array.
  • While multiple VVol Protocol Endpoints are supported, it’s up to each vendor to decide what they want to support. Today most vendors only support a single Protocol Endpoint for the entire storage array.
  • The minimum size of a VVol is 1MB. Storage arrays must support at least 2TB VVols.
  • The maximum size of a data‐VVol is as large as whatever vSphere supports (62TB). The maximum size of a config‐VVol is currently 4GB. ESXi hosts will never try to create a virtual volume larger than what the array advertises as maximum.
  • The maximum number of VVols supported by a storage array is up to each vendor to decide what they want to support. The maximum number of VVols required by VMs in a cluster of ESXi hosts is the product of maximum number of virtual disks per VM (60), maximum number of snapshots per virtual disk (32), and maximum number of VMs per vCenter cluster (10,000). This make the theoretical maximum around 19 million total VVols.
  • The minimum number VVols a powered-on VM will have is 3 (config, swap, data) (swap goes away when VM is powered off). Each snapshot will add at least one additional VVol per virtual disk (plus an additional if memory state is selected). The maximum number of VVols a powered-on VM could have is around 2,000: 1 – config, 1 – swap, 60 – data, 1,920 – snapshots (60×32), 32 – memory state.
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Apr 24 2015

Another VVols webinar from Taneja Group featuring VMware speakers

Another VVols webinar coming up from Taneja Group who is doing a whole series of webinars on VVols, the first which was on April 2nd and I participated in was a panel discussion with several storage vendors (NetApp, HP, NexGen & Dell) giving their views and opinions on VVols. The next one on April 30th features two speakers from VMware: Juan Novella (Product Marketing Manager) and Ken Werneburg (Senior Technical Marketing Architect). It should be a good and informative session and it is the prelude to some additional Taneja deep dive webinars on VVols from individual vendors. I’ve signed on to represent HP at one which will be held in May. So click the link below and register and find out what VMware has to say about VVols.


Join us for the first in a series of fast-paced and informative 60-minute webinars, as we discuss with VMware one of the hottest topics in the datacenter: VMware vSphere Virtual Volumes (VVol). VVol is the industry’s first solution to enable native virtual machine-awareness across a broad range of SAN/NAS arrays. VVol is packaged as a feature in nearly all VMware vSphere Editions and is being embraced by storage partners at an unprecedented rate. IT professionals, especially those involved in datacenter operations, are showing great interest in implementing VVol in their own environments.

This moderated session features Juan Novella and Ken Werneburg, VVol experts from VMware, who will discuss VVol technology, the rapidly expanding ecosystem, and the impact this game-changing capability will have in the datacenter. Attendees will be encouraged to submit their questions during the session.

Panelists:
Juan Novella, Product Marketing Manager – Storage; VMware
Ken Werneburg, Senior Architect – Technical Marketing; VMware

VVols-disrupt

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Apr 14 2015

3 new vendors added to the VMware Virtual Volumes Compatibility Guide

I posted about a month ago that only 4 vendors supported VMware Virtual Volumes (VVols) on Day 1 of the vSphere launch. Now a month later 3 more vendors have completed their certification of VVols with vSphere 6 and have been added to the VMware Hardware Compatibility Guide: NetApp, Hitachi (HDS) and Fujitsu. The following table outlines all the vendors that currently support VVols:

PartnerModelsArray TypeFW/OS Ver.FeaturesVASA Provider
HP3PAR StoreServ 7000 & 10000 StorageFiber Channel3.2.1Internal
IBMXIVFiber Channel11.5.1Multi-VC,VPHA (active-passive)External
NEC iStorage M110, M310, M510, M710Fiber Channel & iSCSI010A
SANBlaze TechnologyVirtuaLUNFiber Channel & iSCSI7.3Multi-VC,VPHA (active-active)
NetAppFAS3200, FAS6200, FAS 8000 SeriesNAS8.2.3External
Hitachi (HDS)NAS 4060, NAS 4080, NAS 4100NAS12.2.3753.08External
FujitsuETERNUS DX100 S3, DX200 S3, DX500 S3, DX600 S3, DX200 FFiber Channel & iSCSIV10

Note: be sure and check the VMware HCG for the latest information

Of the 3 new vendors, NetApp was one of the original VMware design partners of VVols, Dell was also a design partner so its odd that they have not completed certification yet. Also I had thought NetApp had said they would support VVols on all protocols and were the only vendor that supported that right now but they are currently only listed as supporting NAS at the moment.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Virtual Volumes link and information page for all the latest info from each vendor.

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